The highly anticipated RuPaul’s Drag Race reunion is tomorrow, May 6th. All the girls from the season will join back together and “RuCap” the whole season. The three queens left are Jinkx Monsoon, Roxxxy Andrews and Alaska Thunderfuck. Each with their own personality, outlook and style; they are three of the fiercest queens around.

The underdog of them all, Jinkx has proven to have much talent when it comes to comedy and acting. She is one to be feared. Jinkx has remained true to herself by not relying on others for support during the competition. she’s young, and personifies a teenager in the 60’s.

https://twitter.com/JinkxMonsoon

Roxxxy Andrews is a “bigger” queen to say the least. she had struggles in the past with her weight and she is very proud and loves her bigness. She comes from the pageant world of drag and she doesn’t possess much acting and comedy skills. what she lacks in those areas, she makes up for in style and beauty. Roxxxy tends to be mean, taking this competition very seriously without any care of who she takes down.

 https://twitter.com/RoxxxyAndrews

Alaska has huge shoes to fill. Her boyfriend/ girlfriend, Sharon Needles, was the last season winner of Drag Race. Alaska is also a comedy queen and she can dress up fairly nicely. She always had the others on the show laughing. Although she teamed up with two other queens during the competition, she realized with the help of the judges that she was not playing it smart that way. The only one you can trust is yourself.

https://twitter.com/Alaska5000

Stay tuned to LOGO on May 6th and watch the much anticipated reunion show. Also, find the queens on twitter and tweet at logo to tell who you would like to win.

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                 Every year, hundreds of gays, lesbians and LGBT supporters go to Pensacola Florida for one of the year’s biggest LGBT events in the U.S. It is often nicknamed “sexacola” along with being deemed “the forbidden parties.”   

                The dates of the 4th annual four-day Gay Memorial Day Weekend party are May 23 to May 27, 2013 and there is a projected 150,000 attendees from all over the south to come to this celebration. Along with many people coming to this spot, they will also be hitting the bars and clubs all along Pensacola to ensure a great weekend of drinks, dancing and music from many well heard of DJ’s.  There are many gay popular bars and clubs that will be jam packed with all walks of life. Attendees are advised to bring tents for shelter from the hot summer sun, for you will be outside most of the weekend. Pensacola may be far away from you, but the trip there will be well worth it. This huge celebration of acceptance of being born the way you are will be one to remember years and years to come.

 

http://www.sexacolabeach.com/

               

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The nights are getting warmer, the clothes are getting skimpier and it’s summer time in Memphis. The biggest LGBT Club in Memphis, club                          

                  Spectrum, will be having their first foam party of the year on May 10th. Many people look forward to this time of year when Spectrum allows one of their most fun nights to include bubbles, drinks and music. One huge room, full of people ready to be soaked, amazing dance music and never ending flows of foam will be the way to spend this night if you’re ready to kick off a great summer and the end of the school semester.  The usual rules apply: must be 18 to dance and 21 to drink, must be wearing shoes for safety reasons. Spectrum Memphis is located at 616 Marshall Ave. Be sure to arrive around 11 p.m. for the crowd to be there, or earlier to get drinks before the dancing begins.

 

https://www.facebook.com/SPECTRUMemphis?fref=ts

     Dating can be a tricky subject to talk about, everyone is different in what they want. First off, you have to know what you want. Do you want a relationship? Do you just want friends? When you separate your wants from needs you have your start. Here are just a few tips to having a successful relationship.

    Don’t be too needy, you have to be independent and not rely on others. In general, if things don’t end up the way you wanted them to, you wont be as hurt in the end.

     Set boundaries. Each and every one of us has something that really sets us off. Once you get to know someone on a deeper level, all their pet peeves will become known. And just like you have them, you don’t want to set your partner off in anger.

     Establish trust. With trust, you have absolutely nothing to keep the two of you together. Trust them to be honest and talk to you, trust them to be faithful and they too should instill this trust in you.

      Take time away from each other, if the two of you spend too much time around each other, you will get very sick of each other. Going to work is a good way to get time away, school, friends and family are also good ways to separate yourselves.

 

Be sure to read more about dating in the gay world further down on the blog :)

          If you’re gay or have a gay friend or two, you’ve probably heard of “Grindr,” “BoyAhoy,” or “Jack’d.” all of these are social apps for phones that use location based services to find gays near your location. You use these apps however you want to, looking for a hookup, relationships, chats, dates or just friends; these apps will provide. Some gays don’t bother with these apps. They tend to bring along much more drama than wanted, although, you can have good luck and find someone to be in a relationship with.

          “I’ve had these apps before. I usually delete them and end up downloading them back,” says Seth Rabinowitz, a DJ at the gay club. “It’s funny seeing people on the apps and then in person when they walk into the club. You could say I know too many peoples drama in the gay community.” 

                You can go to the club, the bar, school, work, anywhere and log onto an app and find gays near you. Look at them, choose which you would like to chat with, it’s as simple as that. Grindr is the most used app in the gay community. You see it on almost all gays’ phones. “Grindr to a gay is like a Christian with their Bible, they don’t go anywhere without it.”

          “Since its founding in 2009, Grindr’s exploding popularity and its innovation in location-based social networking has captivated the press both in the U.S. and abroad. From The New York Times to The Guardian U.K., the biggest deals in news have been dropping the Grindr name.” says grindr.com. Grindr is mostly 18 to 32- year- old guys who are typically athletic with a strong form of cockiness and rudeness to go along with it.

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          Yet another app for finding gays near you, BoyAhoy is more colorful and playful. It offers much more than Grindr does, you can “wink” at boys, send them gifts, and unlock their “backstage” pictures. According to boyahoy.com,  “BoyAhoy connects you to other users nearby or continents away, in more than 100 countries, whether you’re looking for new friends or activity partners. Our virtual environment is rich with personal experiences thanks to features like chatting, exchanging photos or notes, and sending virtual gifts.” All of these apps are very different than the next; they have to stick out to a certain type of gays for a great amount of users.

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Lastly, Jack’d is the underdog of the other apps, not as many users flock to this platform like they do to Grindr. “Mostly 25-45 average shape some athletic, some really out of shape. Generally very little attitude, more risqué public photos and profile text allowed.” Says jackd.com.

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“I never really liked using grindr that much. It’s full of nasty people who weren’t looking for what I was looking for, which was true love. I actually found it when I found my boyfriend, Jon, online at school one day. We have been together ever since and I’m so thankful to have actually had luck using the app.” Says Seth Busby, 20.

“I tend not to date anymore,” says Dallas Cossey, 19, “ I’ve been hurt many times in the past because I jumped into the gay community at a younger age than most do. It’s forced me to do a lot of growing up in the past years, people often tell me I have an old soul. I encourage people to date, it’s just not for me. I’m super busy with school and work that I tell myself I have no time to date, and I’d much rather spend the money on myself than anyone else.” 

“I tend not to date anymore, I’ve been hurt many times in the past because I jumped into the gay community at a younger age than most do. It’s forced me to do a lot of growing up in the past years, people often tell me I have an old soul. I encourage people to date, it’s just not for me. I’m super busy with school and work that I tell myself I have no time to date, and I’d much rather spend the money on myself than anyone else.” Dallas Cossey, 19.

There are many successful couples in the gay world, they grow old and get married (where it’s allowed) and some even adopt children and live a happy normal life together.

We all know that being hurt is a realization in every type of relationship, some could say  a considerable more amount in the gay community. Some gays even point out that gays move faster than straight couples and we fall for other guys much more quickly without thinking of the consequences. We are all on the pursuit of happiness and the ways to achieve it vary greatly person to person. 

myqueertestimony:

Testimony by ‘BAD BLACK’, BRIAN, EMA, SIMON, and CLEO, Kampala, Uganda
Photographs by Mathias Christensen 
Article titled: ”Gay People in Uganda: love on the run” by Rasmus Thirup Beck
In Uganda, gay people are being forced into exile. If a new bill becomes law, homosexuality will be punishable by death – which means many people are choosing to leave and seek asylum elsewhere. With the vote on the country’s anti-homosexuality bill set to become public in the coming days, photographer Mathias Christensen met gay people in Uganda who fear the changing of the law.
Published by The Guardian, 2/3/13

myqueertestimony:

Testimony by ‘BAD BLACK’, BRIAN, EMA, SIMON, and CLEO, Kampala, Uganda

Photographs by Mathias Christensen 

Article titled: Gay People in Uganda: love on the run by Rasmus Thirup Beck

In Uganda, gay people are being forced into exile. If a new bill becomes law, homosexuality will be punishable by death – which means many people are choosing to leave and seek asylum elsewhere. With the vote on the country’s anti-homosexuality bill set to become public in the coming days, photographer Mathias Christensen met gay people in Uganda who fear the changing of the law.

Published by The Guardian, 2/3/13

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Too often, we associate the process of “coming out of the closet” only with the negative connotations: the threat of losing the trust and respect of our family; losing friends; becoming confused with our religious beliefs; the seemingly exponentially increasing possibility of contracting HIV or some other venereal disease; or even the prospect of losing faith in ourselves. But what of the positive things? What of those effects that bring us joy and annoyingly unrelenting smiles? What of the new respect for love that we gain? What about the prospect of finally being able to express ourselves truly without the need for hiding behind shadows? Or even the ability to finally sing that Britney Spears song that you’ve been mumbling only in the shower?

I came to terms with my homosexuality in seventh grade, when I stumbled upon a classmate of mine in the gym showers and came out of the closet in the eleventh grade, before I left for foster care. Yes, I lost friends, and yes, I lost some credibility in myself. I had always been a devout Christian; coming out of the closet only muddled my faith in God. However, after a while, I chose not to center all of my attention on those negative effects, for I was already wallowing in enough drama in my life at the time. Thus, I reveled in the things that brought me joy, such as the satisfaction of expressing myself openly and the ability to hold a “Bring it on marathon” without the questioning glances my way.

            Along the way, I came to realize that no matter the circumstance, I would not trade my coming out for anything in the world. It’s much more than a closet that I exhumed myself from; I crawled out of self-pity, guilt, ashamedness, fear, depression, and struggles with self-acceptance. I shunned away from my habit of cowering behind shadows. From that, I learned to embrace the light, to enjoy the fact that I am me, no matter what. Sure, I know the lyrics to every Beyoncé and Rihanna song that there is, but I am no longer ashamed to admit it. To be completely honest, being in the closet served me well. Hell, how do you think that we homosexuals learned to dress so well?!” DeVaughn Norway, 19

       “One night as I was helping my mom put sheets on her bed, somehow, we began talking about homosexuality and about someone who was gay. She made the comment, “At least you aren’t like that.”

     My parents had asked me frequently while I was growing whether or not I was gay; I had always lied to them. However, this particular night I had enough. So I replied with, “What if I was?” 

          She was dumbfounded. She had to sit down on the bed to avoid falling down. She started asking me what I meant by that, and things kept spiraling out of control until eventually I just said, “I’m gay.”

          It was one of the hardest things that I’ve ever had to do in my life so far. She cried the entire time we were sitting there. She then told me that it would be better if she told me dad, rather than me. My parents are both conservative Church of Christ believers, so it was very taboo for me to be gay. Coming out as an atheist around the same time didn’t really help things, either.

        At first, they simply brushed off the fact that I told them. It was to be kept a secret from the world, even though it was whispered about frequently among my friends and family. It was as if I had been given a shiny red “A” on my chest.

            Weeks passed, and I was sent to several therapists through my parents in an attempt to help “cure” whatever had happened to me; nothing changed. One therapist I saw was actually very helpful and supportive of me. He brought me out of the depression which I had acquired at that point due to constant stress, judgment and insult. My parents then continued to try to “cure” me by sending me to a Church of Christ college, which has actually made me a better person, even though I have differing religious views, and I am prohibited from displaying any sign that I’m gay.
            While my parents still aren’t okay with my sexuality, they are slowly getting used to the fact that it won’t be disappearing. While it was an extremely difficult step to take in my life, I’m very glad that I did so. The struggles that I have gone through have only shaped my life for the better, and I wouldn’t be who I am without all the pain.” Mason Hillis, 19.